view www/index.html @ 22:84b321099814

Remove another generated file shipped by zlib, so we don't depend on the weird non-posix busybox cp mode.
author Rob Landley <rob@landley.net>
date Tue, 27 Dec 2011 08:49:05 -0600
parents 73ab228e8da3
children 5555993a80c5
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<title>Build Control Images</title>

<h1>Control Images</h1>

<p>These are squashfs images that plug into <a href=/aboriginal>Aboriginal
Linux</a> to drive an automated software build.  These images are
target-independent and self-contained: they include source code and build
control scripts, and upload the result to the host via FTP through the virtual
network.</p>

<ul>
<li><a href=downloads>Download source code</a></li>
<li><a href=downloads/binaries>Download binaries</a></li>
<li><a href=/hg/control-images>Mercurial Repository</a></li>
</ul>

<p>Development discussion goes on the
<a href=http://lists.landley.net/listinfo.cgi/aboriginal-landley.net>Aboriginal Linux mailing list</a>.</p>

<h2>How to use</h2>

<p>Each system image tarball includes a "./native-build.sh" which expects a
control image as its argument.  The results are uploaded through the
virtual network to an "upload" subdirectory under the system image
directory.</p>

<p>This attaches the control image as the third
virtual hard drive provided to QEMU (the first is the root filesystem, the
second is a sparse 2 gigabyte ext3 filesystem provided by dev-environment.sh
and mounted on /home to provide writeable space for the build).  The Aboriginal
Linux init script (sbin/init.sh) will mount this /dev/hdc on /mnt and check for
an executable "/mnt/init".  If it finds one, it will run that instead of
launching a shell prompt.  (It pauses for three seconds for the user to press
any key to get a shell prompt anyway.)  When the script exits, the system
image shuts down causing QEMU to exit.</p>

<p>The /mnt/init script can use busybox ftpput to upload its results to
the host using FTP_SERVER and FTP_PORT environment variables.  (By default
native-build.sh runs the busybox ftp server on the host, writing into an
"upload" subdirectory.)</p>

<h2>Example usage:</h2>

<blockquote><pre>
cd system-image-armv5l
./native-build.sh ../static-tools.hdc
ls -l upload
</pre></blockquote>

<h2>Can I use this on real hardware?</h2>

<p>Sure, grab a root-filesystem tarball, chroot into it (probably via
sbin/init.sh to set up the mount points properly), mount the squashfs
on /mnt, and run /mnt/init.</p>

<p>You might want to export values for "CPUS", "HOST", "FTP_SERVER", and
"FTP_PORT", and maybe even set up distcc
(see dev-environment.sh for an example).</p>

<h1>Creating build images</h1>

<p>Download the source code and run "./build.sh" to list available build
images (from the "images" directory).  Run "./build.sh all" to compile
everything.</p>

<p>This build infrastructure is largely copied from Aboriginal Linux.</p>

<h2>Designing your own build control images</h2>

<p>The native-build.sh script attaches the control image as the third
virtual hard drive provided to QEMU, hence the "hdc" extension.
The init scripts then mount this on /mnt, and run /mnt/init if it exists
instead of starting a command shell. From there, the script can do anything
it needs to.</p>

<p>The full environment is:</p>

<ul>
<li><p>The first disk is Aboriginal Linux's squashfs root filesystem,
attached by run-emulator.sh and mounted on "/".  This contains a simple
native Linux development environment built from busybox,
uClibc, gcc, binutils, make, and bash.</p></li>

<li><p>The second disk is a sparse 2 gigabyte ext3 filesystem created and
attached by dev-environment.sh, which then calls run-emulator.sh.  If
/dev/hdb (or /dev/sdb) exists, sbin/init.sh will mount it
on "/home" to provide writeable space for the build.  (Otherwise it
mounts a tmpfs there.)</p>

<p>The dev-environment.sh script also sets up distcc if distccd and the
appropriate cross compiler are in the host's $PATH.  It creates a directory
of symlinks to the cross compiler binaries and runs distccd
with a restricted $PATH so it can only find the cross compiler, and sets
DISTCC_HOSTS=$ADDRESS:$PORT/$CPUS on the kernel command line.<p>
</li>

<li><p>The third disk is the build control image attached by
native-build.sh, which then calls dev-environment.sh.  The Aboriginal
Linux init script (sbin/init.sh) will mount this /dev/hdc on /mnt and check for
an executable "/mnt/init".  If it finds one, it will run that instead of
launching a shell prompt.  (It pauses for three seconds for the user to press
any key to get a shell prompt anyway.)  When the script exits, the system
image shuts down causing QEMU to exit.</p>

<p>The native-build.sh script also sets the FTP_SERVER and FTP_PORT environment
variables, allowing the /mnt/init script to use busybox ftpput to upload its
results to the host. using FTP_SERVER and FTP_PORT environment variables.
If these variables aren't already set, native-build.sh runs the busybox ftp
server on the host, configured to write into an "upload" subdirectory.</p>
</li>
</ul>

<p>Creating your own build control image means creating a squashfs with
what you want to appear on /mnt.  It must contain at least an executable "init"
file.</p>

<h2>The basic control image build infrastructure</h2>

<p>The "common" directory contains common code available to each build script.
The top level "build.sh" file pulls in the common definitions from
"common/include.sh", calls the "images/$NAME/build.sh" for the image in
question, and then makes a squashfs of the result.  Control images are
created by running "./build.sh imagename", or "./build.sh all" to iterate
through all available images/*/build.sh files.  The output should show
up in the "build" directory.</p>

<p>The source code for control images lives under the "images" directory, each
in its own subdirectory.  Each one provides a file "images/$NAME/build.sh"
which populates a "$TOP/build/$NAME" directory and should contain an executable
file called "init" and any other files that init program requires.</p>

<p>You can write your own images/$NAME/build.sh, which can put anything it wants
into the resulting image.  (It doesn't have to perform a native build, it
can launch a server or something.  Up to you.)</p>

<h2>The bootstrap infrastructure</h2>

<p>The other option is to use the "bootstrap" infrastructure by linking
an image's download.sh to common/builder.sh.  This copies the common/bootstrap
code into the resulting system image, calls "images/$NAME/download.sh" to add
additional package source, and copies additional files (I.E. build scripts)
from the "images/$NAME/mnt" directory.  This download.sh can use the same
"download" function as aboriginal linux
(there's a copy in include/download_functions.sh).</p>

<p>A bootstrap image builds packages and installs them into the system
image, copying the system to a writeable /home/chroot first if necessary using
setup-chroot.  Note that the control image is --bind mounted into the new
chroot, and thus remains read only.</p.

<p>The /mnt/run-build-stages.sh script iterates through
/mnt/package-list and calls /mnt/build-one-package.sh on each name listed,
in order.  (It keeps a list of packages it's built in /usr/src/manifest so
it can skip rebuilding successfully installed packages if interactively
stopped and restarted.)</p>

<p>/mnt/build-one-package.sh calls build scripts out of /mnt/build which can
end in different extensions indicating how to set up the writeable build
directory:</p>

<ul>
<li><b>.sh</b> - copy a tree of symlinks from /mnt/packages to /home</li>
<li><b>.nolink</b> - copy file contents from /mnt/packages to /home</li>
<li><b>.nosrc</b> - this package has no source code</li>
</ul>

<p>When /mnt/run-build-stages.sh exits, /mnt/init uploads a tarball of the
resulting chroot filesystem.  The intended use is to convert the minimal
native development environment into a distribution environment for use
with an existing distribution's package manager and source repository.</p>